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How To Create a SHA-256 Self-Signed Certificate

Moderate - requires admin permissions

Overview

Self-signed certificates are acceptable for testing anything used internal.  By default, certificates created through Internet Information Services (IIS) on most Windows OS versions are based on the SHA-1 algorithm rather than the SHA-256 algorithm.  SHA-1 certificates are less secure due to their smaller bit size and are in the process of being sunset by all web browsers.

Step-by-Step

  1. Run PowerShell as administrator

  2. Run the following command to create the certificate:

    New-SelfSignedCertificate –DnsName < Computer name > -CertStoreLocation “cert:\LocalMachine\My”

    <Computer name> should be the name of the computer hosting the Jet Web Portal.  It should be fully qualified with the domain name (computer.domain.com).

  3. Next, we need to add the self-signed certificate as a trusted certificate authority...

    Run MMC -32 as administrator

  4. Select File > Add or Remove Snap-ins. The Add or Remove Snap-ins window is displayed.

  5. Select Certificates and then click Add. The Certificates snap-in window is displayed.

  6. Select Computer account and press Next. The Select Computer page is displayed.

  7. Select Local computer, then click Finish . Then Click OK .

  8. Find the certificate in Personal > Certificates :

  9. Right-click on the newly created certificate and then select Properties .  Input the desired Friendly Name field for the certificate based upon what you are testing.  Once completed, select the Apply button followed by OK .

    cert3.png

  10. Right-click on the certificate and choose Copy

  11. Expand Trusted Root Certificate Authorities

  12. Right-click on the Certificates folder

  13. Select Paste

  14. In IIS Manager (usually requiring Administrator permissions), you can now see the self-signed certificate with SHA-256 as the SSL certificate.

    cert5.png

Related Articles

Published:

How To Create a SHA-256 Self-Signed Certificate

Moderate - requires admin permissions

Overview

Self-signed certificates are acceptable for testing anything used internal.  By default, certificates created through Internet Information Services (IIS) on most Windows OS versions are based on the SHA-1 algorithm rather than the SHA-256 algorithm.  SHA-1 certificates are less secure due to their smaller bit size and are in the process of being sunset by all web browsers.

Step-by-Step

  1. Run PowerShell as administrator

  2. Run the following command to create the certificate:

    New-SelfSignedCertificate –DnsName < Computer name > -CertStoreLocation “cert:\LocalMachine\My”

    <Computer name> should be the name of the computer hosting the Jet Web Portal.  It should be fully qualified with the domain name (computer.domain.com).

  3. Next, we need to add the self-signed certificate as a trusted certificate authority...

    Run MMC -32 as administrator

  4. Select File > Add or Remove Snap-ins. The Add or Remove Snap-ins window is displayed.

  5. Select Certificates and then click Add. The Certificates snap-in window is displayed.

  6. Select Computer account and press Next. The Select Computer page is displayed.

  7. Select Local computer, then click Finish . Then Click OK .

  8. Find the certificate in Personal > Certificates :

  9. Right-click on the newly created certificate and then select Properties .  Input the desired Friendly Name field for the certificate based upon what you are testing.  Once completed, select the Apply button followed by OK .

    cert3.png

  10. Right-click on the certificate and choose Copy

  11. Expand Trusted Root Certificate Authorities

  12. Right-click on the Certificates folder

  13. Select Paste

  14. In IIS Manager (usually requiring Administrator permissions), you can now see the self-signed certificate with SHA-256 as the SSL certificate.

    cert5.png

Related Articles

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